Collection Sheet – 2016

March 2016

INDICA EMPORIA : INDIAN TEXTILE SHOW

Lakme Fashion Week, Resort 2016

Goan designer Wendell Rodricks brings to Lakme Fashion Week a tableau celebrating the wealthy legacy of handwoven Indian textiles for LFW Resort 2016. Researching Indian costumes sourced from Indian and international museums, Rodricks puts the spotlight on and creates a fusion of twenty Indian costume icons. This results in a unique suite of ensembles that blend colour, hand wovens, styling and silhouettes to create an invigorating narrative, updating Indian clothing to a new future in 2016. Woven with khadi cotton, Dupione, Eri and Mugha silk, the textiles also touch technology with foil splattering and printing. Hand dyed and woven to create lines, checks and evolved shapes based on Indian geometry, the designer explores Indian pattern pieces to a contemporary modernity yet retaining his signature minimalist and resort approach to clothing. In a fluid symbiosis of Indian dyer, weaver and design expertise, garments such as a ‘Nehru collared, dhoti-jumpsuit Sari’ emerge. In a vibrant Indian palette that includes beige, sand, turmeric, burnt autumn leaf, pomegranate red, teal, dust grey, amethyst, peacock green, peacock blue and ultra violet, Wendell Rodricks paints a truly Indian canvas that celebrates the vast emporium of Indian textiles and clothing for Indian Textile Day 2016 at Lakme India Fashion Week.

August 2016

TRAPEZOID COLLECTION

Lakme Fashion Week, Winter/Festive 2016

The Trapezoid shape has been in use since ancient times. The Incas and Egyptians used it for archways, doors and windows. Wider at the base with a parallel narrow top with two lateral incline sides reaching the summit. Indian temples also used this geometric form but in a profusely decorative form for the famed gopurams; endowed with Gods and animals. Indians also used the trapezoid for geometry, astronomy, mathematics and algebra calculations.

Schulen Fernandes for Wendell Rodricks, explores the trapezoid in a fashion collection that celebrates this ancient form rarely applied to fashion. Using the form as is and in innovative isosceles and parallelogram styles, garments take shape based on the trapezoid’s various possibilities in silhouette and style details.

The layered looks use sheer X-Ray effects to advantage, blending an ultra feminine palette of pastels. Trapezoid shapes morph onto pin tucks, sewn dotted lines and pattern pieces that create a unique newness on the Indian female form. This shape is perfect for all Indian sizes who tend to have a torso smaller than the hip. In a vast fabric array that uses linen, cotton, light crepes, georgette, paper silk, jacquard and damask, Trapezoid uses twelve weaves. It is the custom made fabrics at the core of the collection that are most exciting. Natural Bemberg weave which is natural viscose that feels like silk, striped Chanderi striped silk cotton, Kerala custom weave cottons, natural dyed Bengal cotton weaves, Malkha cotton and Eco fabric dyed with flowers from the Siddhivinayak temple in Mumbai.

The Trapezoid collection by Schulen Fernandes for Wendell Rodricks also addresses the lack of a uniform sizing standard in India. It pushes the envelope to make clothes that are at times unisize, unisex and unique for all Indian women. The collection is age neutral, proving that pastels are not for a blushing female child, teenager or ladies of vintage elegance. Trapezoid embraces every India woman with it’s delicious colour and unique pattern innovations.

 

December 2016

TRAPEZOID IN TECHNICOLOUR

Rajasthan Heritage Week 2016.

The Trapezoid shape has been in use since ancient times. The Incas and Egyptians used it for archways, doors and windows. Wider at the base with a parallel narrow top with two lateral incline sides reaching the summit. Indian temples also used this geometric form but in a profusely decorative form for the famed gopurams; endowed with Gods and animals.

Gods and animals. Indians also used the trapezoid for geometry, astronomy, mathematics and algebra calculations. Using the form as is and in innovative isosceles and parallelogram styles, garments take shape based on the trapezoid’s various possibilities in silhouette and style details. Trapezoid shapes morph into x-ray sheer stripes, pin tucks, sewn dotted lines and deconstructed layered pieces that create a unique newness on the Indian female form and embraces every Indian woman with it’s pattern innovations. 

With Handmade in Rajasthan, we explore the trapezoid in a fashion collection that celebrates this rarely used ancient form and present it with a contemporary eye that is inspired by the architectural elements of the Amber Palace in Amer Fort, Jaipur. The colour palette of rust red, earthy browns, turquoise blue, haldi yellow and royal rani pink are inspired by the vibrant earthy tones of the beautiful frescoes from the Palace walls. We also feature the Bagru region’s traditional and organic hand block prints on Jootis as well as the Patwa community’s handcrafted jewellery with contemporary details. The medallion design of the jewellery being inspired from the filigree architectural motif of the Queen’s window at the Amber Palace. The fabrics all specially handwoven and hand dyed are in Rajasthani khadi and cotton weaves.

This collection in it’s new-age trapezoid form pushes the envelope to make clothes that are at times unisize, unisex and unique for all Indian women and collaborates well with the heritage culture and crafts straight from the vibrant heart of Rajasthan.

 

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